Politics, property and post-Brexit investments

What is striking about current affairs at the moment is the rapid pace at which everything is moving.

Go to the profile of Natalie Holt
Jul 13, 2016
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What is striking about current affairs at the moment is the rapid pace at which everything is moving.

At the political level, over the last fortnight we have gone from a Conservative leadership contest where five horses were in the running to a definitive new Prime Minister in the form of Theresa May. Labour is also fighting its own internal battles, largely brought on itself.

We will not know what the new shape of Parliament will deliver for financial services policy for some months. Yet the industry is not without its own dramas, particularly the fallout from the spate of suspending dealing and marked down prices we are seeing among property funds at the moment.

As the property sector continues to bear the brunt of uncertainty around valuations, we turn our attention to the UK equity sectors that are best placed to withstand the current market volatility in the wake of the Brexit vote.

Tobacco is tipped by all three of our experts given the bias to overseas markets. Axa Wealth head of investing Adrian Lowcock considers whether gold’s post-Brexit gains are sustainable, while Towry head of investment Andrew Wilson is eyeing some of the mid-cap and smaller companies that could be targets for deals in “cheap pounds”.

Amidst an uncertain backdrop, clients will be increasingly looking to their advisers for reassurance. To get a sense of how firms are coping with Brexit at the coalface, we speak to Saunderson House investment director Chris Sexton on client comms following the EU vote.

He also discusses his firm’s foresight in dialling down commercial property exposure, as well as the difficulty in second-guessing the direction of travel for interest rates.

Go to the profile of Natalie Holt

Natalie Holt

Editor, Money Marketing

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